Tag Archives: vintage

A boy named Charlie Brown

CD Review : Vince Guaraldi Trio – Jazz Impressions of a Boy Named Charlie Brown

A boy named Charlie Brown

Artist – Vince Guaraldi Trio

Title – Jazz Impressions of a Boy Named Charlie Brown

Format – CD ( AAD )

Label – Fantasy Records

Originally released in 1964, CD released 1989

This CD somehow found its way into my collection from one of the many roommates I had in college; lost and unclaimed among the multiple move ins/outs. According to Wikipedia, it is the soundtrack to a 1963 TV documentary about Charles M Schulz’s Peanuts comics, which lead to the 1965 animated Christmas special (that was followed by dozens of forgettable sequels).

The album includes “Linus and Lucy” , a song which all Americans hear roughly a billion times every holiday season yet still somehow retains its charm. The rest of the CD is in an identical vein: cocktail hour jazz piano made by, and for, white people. Which isn’t to say that it’s bad, just that I get the feeling that I should be drinking a martini and lounging on Dutch Modern furniture while this plays.

As for the sound, the double bass booms and buzzes, the hi hat spits out of the left channel and Vince’s piano glitters (but not too brightly) to my right. The whole CD seems to be recorded fairly hot and with not as much dynamic range (the difference between the quietest and loudest parts) as I’d like. It’s nowhere near modern loudness war levels, but it isn’t great either. Overall, the recording is still engaging, so it’s worth throwing on during a classier shindig or if you just want to kick back with some single malt scotch.

Amazon has it for fourteen bucks, but lists it under a slightly different title for some reason. Check it out if you want some accessible jazz for your collection.

Music: B-

Sound: C+

Green hi-fi

Green hi-fi

Caring about the environment is another pillar of hipsterdom, so if you’re going to get into hi-fi, you should do it in a eco-friendly way. There’s a few ways to go about this:

Green hi-fi
Image courtesy of www.ecdsounddesign.com

1. Use energy efficient amplification

The folks at MetaEfficient drew up a list of power saving stereo amplifiers, but most of them are beefy power amps that require a separate pre-amp to function. More resources, more space, more weight, etc. However, one amp on the list that stands out is the Onkyo A-9555 which uses efficient digital circuitry and is available new for only $439.99.

2. Buy from sustainable companies

NAD Electronics, in addition to using efficient circuitry and standby modes in its products, also avoids using harmful heavy metals or excessive packaging (and utilizes recycled material in the packaging it does use). Cambridge Audio, another affordable hi-fi company, also has a strong environmental commitment, as well as pledging to not use child or prison labor. Now that’s a plus!

3. Buy used gear

If you’re just starting out, thrift stores can be a great place to find components for your system. You can also check out the Audiogon Marketplace for deals on used high-end gear, and eBay or Craigslist are options as well. By buying used, you keep old electronics out of landfills, reduce the amount of resources consumed, and just might score some hip vintage stuff to impress your guests!

4. Listen to vinyl

Keeping with the thrift store theme, there are tons of old vinyl records out there that would otherwise end up in a dump. Sure, you wouldn’t be caught dead listening to most of the crap they have at Goodwill, but there are some great finds if you’re willing to look. Plus, all those Burt Bacharach records you’ll find can be hung on the wall for decoration or turned into DIY snack bowls or bookends. And finally, turntables use less power than other music sources; my turntable consumes only 2 watts while my Sony SACD player sucks down 15 watts.

Vinyl records versus CD = what do hi-fi lovers prefer?

Vinyl vs CD

An endless debate has raged among audio lovers since the introduction of the Compact Disc in 1982. Detractors of the format complained of a “harsh”, or “bright” sound and stood by their vinyl records as the truest form of music reproduction. Those in the CD camp extolled the format’s ease of use and setup, lack of pops and clicks, no need for extensive cleaning procedures, and the fact that they could hold more music.

Both sides had valid points; early CDs did not sound very good for many reasons. The first CD players released used inferior decoding equipment and frequency cutoffs, fixed in later players by better circuitry and processors. Additionally, recording engineers in the early days of CD were not used to mixing and mastering for the format, hence the unpleasant sound. As for vinyl, the drawbacks are still clear: dust and dirt affects the sound, the grooves eventually wear out, and the frequency response is slightly more limited. Not to mention that turntables can be fiddly, complex things to set up (although some people like them for that).

My opinion on all this is that both formats are equally valid in anyone’s colleciton, and like pretty much anything in hi-fi, it’s all up to the listener’s personal preference. My vinyl collection is currently bigger than my CD/SACD library (and my MP3 list is bigger than both, more on that some other time). My preference for vinyl or CD depends a lot the type of music. Jazz and classical seem to fit CD better since there is a lack of surface noise, which can be distracting with quieter instrumental pieces. Rock music is more at home on vinyl, partly for the “authenticity factor”, but also because louder instrumentation tends to cancel out any noise caused by debris on the record.

But what I like the most about vinyl is the artwork. It’s much larger, bolder and overall nicer to look at than the tiny renditions squeezed onto a CD booklet. For example, the artwork on the CD version of The Grand Wazoo is cramped and compressed, but on the vinyl version’s cover you can see much more amusing, Sergio Aragones-esque detail.

So for hi-fi newbies, there is no need to throw out your CD collection. If you’re looking to start a vinyl collection, a good place to start first would be a local thrift or charity store. The records are usually incredibly cheap, but the drawback is the selection (hope you like Barbara Streisand or Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass!) and the physical condition of the records is often quite poor. But at around a buck a pop, its not a huge loss if you take one home and find it unplayably damaged. Within all the crap, there are hidden gems at these stores; recently I got the first two volumes of The Beethoven Bicentennial Collection (by Deutsche Grammophon) for 20 bucks. It includes all 9 of his symphonies and were in great condition.

More debate and discussion on Vinyl vs CD from Google Answers